Sugar Beets

Half of the sugar produced in the United States is derived from sugar beet, a yellowish-white root crop related to red table beets and chard1. Sugar beets are generally grown in cooler, temperate climates. On average, sugar beets have a higher sugar content (16%) than sugar cane (13%), though growing conditions can affect the sugar content of both crops2. Much like other commodity crops, the pulp left over from refining sugar beets is often used in animal feed.

Herbicide Tolerant Insect resistant Disease resistant
 

 
 

Cultivation
United States (98.5% of acreage in 2014)3
Canada (96% of acreage in 2014)4,5

  1. “Information for Consumers.” Sugar Industry Biotech Council Information for Consumers Comments. Sugar Industry Biotech Council, n.d. Web.
  2. “Sugar Beet White Sugar.” AgriBusiness Handbook (2009): n. pag. EastAgri. FAO Investment Center Division, 2009. Web.
  3. James, Clive. 2014. Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: 2014. ISAAA Brief  No. 49. ISAAA: Ithaca, NY. 19. Print.
  4. James, Clive. 2014. Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: 2014. ISAAA Brief  No. 49. ISAAA: Ithaca, NY. 72. Print.
  5. Mchughen, Alan. “Where in the World Are GM Crops and Foods?” GM Crops & Food 4.3 (2013): 172-82. GMO Inquiry 2015. Canadian Biotechnology Action Network (CBAN), 30 Mar. 2015. Web.